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An inside view into the day to day of conceptual artist Sophia Wallace


#fine art #art #conceptual art #body politics, #cliteracy #solidgoldclit #gender #art photography #photography #contemporary art #theory #artists on tumblr #gender #queer #race #law #power #the body #text #conceptual #representation #discourse #collect #brooklyn arts #studio #artist studio #social practice

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By Sophia Wallace from CLITERACY 100 Natural Laws, laser cut 300lb cotton rag, spacers (c) 2014 All Rights Reserved. #sophiawallace #cliteracy #instaart #collectart  (at Sunset Park, Brooklyn)

By Sophia Wallace from CLITERACY 100 Natural Laws, laser cut 300lb cotton rag, spacers (c) 2014 All Rights Reserved. #sophiawallace #cliteracy #instaart #collectart (at Sunset Park, Brooklyn)

Posted on Friday, June 27th 2014

After Our Bodies Meet reviewed in the Huffington Post Art Section

This month, a group of queer feminist artists is tackling a subject that’s as relevant to the pioneers of second-wave feminism as it is to the riot grrrls and intersectional feminists of today. “After Our Bodies Meet: From Resistance to Potentiality” will gather together works by contemporary artists who challenge the “body oppression” of yesterday and today. From Tee Corrine’s “Cunt Coloring Book,” published in 1975, to Chitra Ganesh’s 2013 prints of dramatic, Bollywood-esque scenes, the survey aims to connect decades of narratives about sexuality, power and body politics.

The collection of mixed media projects is pointedly multicultural, as Zanele Muholi portrays black queer communities in South Africa and LA-based Heather Cassils reflects on his experience as a transgender man. Sophia Wallace reintroduces audiences to her CLITERACY project, throwing phallocentric readings of art and science to the wind. Chris E. Vargas, Allyson Mitchell, Catherine Opie, Cathy Cade and Laura Aguilar join the ranks as well, amounting to a group show that references the concerns of early feminists bottled up in the language spoken by contemporary, politically-charged figures today.

"If we can’t use the historic language of art because so much of it is misogynous, what language are we supposed to use as women artists?" Chicago continues in the same Gadfly article. "If we can’t use the female body, for example, because there is such a thin line between representation and colonization, then what are we supposed to do? To build a new language, that’s a big job."

The show, curated by Alexis Heller, is on view at New York’s Leslie-Lohman Museum until August 3. If you’re not lucky enough to be in the area, check out a preview of the exhibition below.”

Full article: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/19/after-our-bodies-meet_n_5501059.html?utm_hp_ref=arts

Leslie-Lohman Museum
26 Wooster Street 
New York, NY 10013 
(Between Grand & Canal)

 Hours
12-6pm, Tuesday-Sunday
12-8pm on Thursday 
Closed: Mondays and all major Holidays

Admission to Leslie-Lohman Museum is Free

Posted on Thursday, June 19th 2014

When asked, in an interview back in 1999, whether or not one painting could adequately challenge masculine representations of God, the inimitable Judy Chicago replied, “Not one painting… One painting can’t possibly have that power. But if in the museum there were a lot of paintings by women who have made images of the female as the divine, then maybe it could begin to have an effect. But no one image can do that by itself.”

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/19/after-our-bodies-meet_n_5501059.html?utm_hp_ref=arts
 | By Katherine Brooks
From a review of After Our Bodies Meet

Posted on Thursday, June 19th 2014

The feeling of having my work alongside the legendary Nan Goldin in the paddle8 Pride Auction. Hard to describe. Additionally there are works for sale by Robert Mapplethorpe, Andy Warhol, Keith Haring, Bruce Weber and more. A portion of auction proceeds being donated to Fire Island Artist Residency and Queer NY.

Pride Auction live till June 26th: http://paddle8.com/auctions/pride

Posted on Wednesday, June 18th 2014

#Repost from @thefirstproof

—-

#SophiaWallace’s commentary of female sexuality. CLITERACY, 100 Natural Laws includes a monumental wall of texts which challenge phallocentric biases in science, law, philosophy, politics and the art world. #LeslieLohmanMuseum

#Repost from @thefirstproof —- #SophiaWallace’s commentary of female sexuality. CLITERACY, 100 Natural Laws includes a monumental wall of texts which challenge phallocentric biases in science, law, philosophy, politics and the art world. #LeslieLohmanMuseum

Posted on Monday, June 16th 2014

Was feeling blue. Then this little chihuahua came to my rescue.  (at Fort Greene Park)

Was feeling blue. Then this little chihuahua came to my rescue. (at Fort Greene Park)

Posted on Sunday, June 15th 2014

#Repost from @graysonsquire
—- museum show last night #cliteracy (at Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art)

#Repost from @graysonsquire —- museum show last night #cliteracy (at Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art)

Posted on Friday, June 6th 2014

lesbianartandartists:

Patricia Cronin, Monument to a Marriage (installed at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, NY), 2006

In Monument to a Marriage, Patricia Cronin disrupts another archive, the cemetery. Installed ‘for eternity’ in New York’s smartest necropolis, Monument to a Marriage makes pointed feminist reference to the funerary sculpture through which many nineteenth-century women artists supported themselves. Sculpted in white Carrera marble, Cronin and her partner lie entwined upon a modern mattress among the memorials to the partners in and products of state sanctioned heterosexuality. By taking anticipatory revenge, Cronin out-manouevres the reality that she and her partner, Deborah Kass, could not be recognized as a family in the eyes of the American state at the time the work was made. “If I can’t have it in life,” says Cronin, “I’m going to have it in death.”

Catherine Lord, “Inside the Body Politic : 1980 - present,” Art & Queer Culture, ed. Catherine Lord and Richard Meyer (New York: Phaidon Press, 2013), 39.

Blown away by #PatriciaCronin

lesbianartandartists:

Patricia Cronin, Monument to a Marriage (installed at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, NY), 2006

In Monument to a Marriage, Patricia Cronin disrupts another archive, the cemetery. Installed ‘for eternity’ in New York’s smartest necropolis, Monument to a Marriage makes pointed feminist reference to the funerary sculpture through which many nineteenth-century women artists supported themselves. Sculpted in white Carrera marble, Cronin and her partner lie entwined upon a modern mattress among the memorials to the partners in and products of state sanctioned heterosexuality. By taking anticipatory revenge, Cronin out-manouevres the reality that she and her partner, Deborah Kass, could not be recognized as a family in the eyes of the American state at the time the work was made. “If I can’t have it in life,” says Cronin, “I’m going to have it in death.”

Catherine Lord, “Inside the Body Politic : 1980 - present,” Art & Queer Culture, ed. Catherine Lord and Richard Meyer (New York: Phaidon Press, 2013), 39.

Blown away by #PatriciaCronin

Posted on Wednesday, May 28th 2014

Reblogged from lesbian art and artists